As I continue to develop my backpacking system, I learn what works and what doesn’t work for me. I’m trying to strike a balance between light weight and luxury. Finding the right combination of gear can be difficult and also season dependent. As I push forward into the 2016 season, I’m getting set up for early spring with a gear list that ultimately will get thinned out as the season progresses.

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31 COMMENTS

  1. There is also redundancy with the sleeping system: if you have a puffy down jacket, bandana and sleeping clothes with sleeping socks, put them all and then you do not need the extra liner (which is more bulk and more weight).
    HOw much is the hammock with all the stuff that comes with it?

  2. For the average man who is in decent shape ( not over weight). You need to be around 35 to 38 pounds for the first couple of years. That is extreme boondocking type camping. Walking around 7 to 10 miles. Elevation drop is around 1000 feet. An experienced hiker can carry around 24 to 28 pounds and have everything he needs for 3 days. Pots, stoves, sleeping bags, tents and large items are not necessary. Switch over to Mountainhouse get you a stainless water bottle 800 ml size and a decent ferro rod. Grab a 10 x 10 ripstock tarp some paracord and a good 6 inch knife. Build your own bed with in 4 feet of the fire. The more knowledge you have with making shelter and collecting water the less you will need to carry. Looks like you have the right idea now just go play with your kit and learn everything you can. Be Safe.

  3. I'VE BEEN USING THE TETON 5500 GRAND BACKPACK . 90L . I ONLY PUT AROUND 35 POUNDS NO MORE THAT'S INCLUDING FOOD FOR A WEEK. THIS SYSTEM IS ONLY FOR LONG TERM HIKING, CAMPING .
    LIKE SOME PEOPLE THEY GO SO LIGHT BECOUSE THEY WANT TO GO FAST. NOT ME . LIFE IS SHORT ENJOY. NEXT YEAR HIKING THE PCT IN OREGON. AND OTHER CONECTING TRAILS AROUND MT HOOD .GOING TO BEGIN AT THE BRIDGE OF GOD'S . !

  4. 7 Categories of Survival:
    – Food (I suggest looking into freezer bag meals)
    – Water (camelbak or light weight water bottles?)
    – Fire (I would just bring a small lighter, pharaoh rod, and some matches)
    – Shelter
    – First Aid (stop major bleeding, blisters, burns, anti diarrhea, shock)
    – Land Navigation (compass? map? Protractor? GPS?)
    – Signaling (didn't mention any signaling mirror or whistle)

    These are the very basics that need to be covered when going into the backcountry. I really appreciate your videos and your willingness to help the youtube community out by sharing your knowledge. From my personal experience this is what I would recommend; only bring one stainless steel pot with a lid and one set of utensils, take one small to medium sized blade that is full tang (Esee Knives), only take one hammock, only take the one warm sleeping bag w/ the sleeping pad, I would just bring a regular bandana, Princeton tech headlamp, forget the lantern, and I would really rethink the crappy rain poncho. I am not trying to rip your video apart or your hard work. I am just giving you my two cents. I hope my suggestions help a bit. I understand this is your older video so some of these things are probably addressed in your "update". Off to watch that one next! Thanks again!

    – King

  5. Definitely not ultralight.  I'd ditch the fuel canisters, and get an inexpensive wood stove.  The Chinese clone of the Silver Fire Scout is about $20 on Amazon and it will fit inside of a 775 ml MSR Stowaway Pot just perfectly.  Just my 2 cents worth.  Thanks for showing us your stuff.

  6. Good video man. Personally I would loose a lot of that gear. However, when I first started out, I brought way to much gear. Point is, you can watch tons of video, talk to hundreds of people, and in the end it all comes down to what you want, need, and feel comfortable with. Happy adventures!