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Saturday, December 7, 2019
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Building a Celtic Roundhouse with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project (PART 1)

We build a bushcraft celtic roundhouse in the forest using hand tools only. In part 1 we collect timber resources, and cut logs ready for the foundations of the bushcraft shelter. The hand tools we will be using for this build are: axe, knife, saw, drawknife and an auger. To begin with we clear a site ready for the construction to begin. We cut a large log using the metre long silky saw. This is to be used for chopping logs. We then re-built our saw horse that we had made in the bushcraft viking house series. We hewed it flat with some wood wedges and axes. Then we made new legs for it. This was also used as a bark peeling jig. We cut 14 logs from the nearby area (all the wood in the immediate area is being forested and we had permission to use these resources). We de-barked the logs and burnt the ends of them. This is an ancient Japanese technique, which helps to make the logs more rot-resistant when they are buried in the ground. These 14 logs will become our vertical posts. The wood we are using is cedar. This is commonly used for Log Cabi building across Europe, especially Scandinavia. It is very rot resistant and although not the hardest of woods, it has proved well when we have built with it in the past. The Celts occupied what we know as Britain over 2,000 years ago. Around the year 500BC. They were incredibly resourceful people and very tribal. Their houses were known as a roundhouse. In the north of England the walls were made with stone, and in the south of Britain they were made with wood as there was more wood available. The roof was thatched and the house had a central firepit with sleeping areas around the outside. This is an important part of British and Irish History and we hope you enjoy joining us on this adventure! In Part 2 we will continue to build the foundation and start to put together the timber frame. We will also be including cooking, feasts and more adventures! Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Check out Dustin’s Behind the Scenes video: //youtu.be/xukyylIPuXk Silky Saws: //www.silky-europe.com GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: //taofficial.com TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: //www.taoutdoors.com/shop/ OUR OTHER CHANNEL TA FISHING: //www.youtube.com/tafishing Watch all VIKING TURF HOUSE Episodes Here: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxC2TSPdh60-zwyMlo-PXVWC Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES): //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg SAXON HOUSE BUILD: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt INSTAGRAM: //www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial FACEBOOK: //www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors TWITTER: //twitter.com/OutdoorsTa FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE: Main Camera: //amzn.to/2SG9unv Drone: //amzn.to/2WSQ1za Standard Lens: //amzn.to/2E5LFxs Wide Angle Lens: //amzn.to/2E3U6t0 Zoom Lens: //amzn.to/2tfb4yl 50mm fixed Lens: //amzn.to/2BvUAGN Main Camera Microphone: //amzn.to/2I9tVVQ Secondary Camera Mic: //amzn.to/2WYP3RQ Radio Microphone: //amzn.to/2Ifqaym Camera Light: //amzn.to/2MYA4mn Powerbank: //amzn.to/2WYQVdk Tripod: //amzn.to/2DtumVm GoPro Action Cam: //amzn.to/2UPS9Wx GoPro Chest Mount: //amzn.to/2tfCkwu GoPro Head Mount: //amzn.to/2WWBra3 Camera SD Cards: //amzn.to/2WVWcT5 Editing Laptop: //amzn.to/2BtRK4S BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE: Bushcraft Pants/Trousers: //amzn.to/2SFY8jf 3x3 Metre Tarp: //amzn.to/2IjM4Az Hammock: //amzn.to/2N0Vpvx Hammock underblanket: //amzn.to/2GmeBmT Thermal Camping Air Mattress: //amzn.to/2N0uQXs Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives: //amzn.to/2SLhWle Medium Axe: //amzn.to/2E5NBWK Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe: //amzn.to/2E5FkC1 Small Hatchet: //amzn.to/2I319Gb Affordable Firesteel: //amzn.to/2N1D3L8 Folding Camp Grill: //amzn.to/2BvF6lM Durable GPS Watch: //amzn.to/2N1fQZl #celtic #roundhouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors
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Building a Turf Roof Viking House with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project (PART 3)

Join us in the forest as we continue to build a bushcraft viking house with turf roof. Using simple hand tools, we built a basic timber frame using mortise and tenon joints. We then added some rafters with some log cabin notches to support them and we lashed these to the ridgepole of the shelter. For part 3 we focused on harvesting the turf for the roof. With the wovel hazel hurdles attached to the roof, these acted as a strong support for the turf to sit on top. It also helps to spread the weight of the turf across the frame itself. We used a spade and dug the turf from nearby glades in the forest. We have never done this before and it is not historically correct to the icelandic turf roof viking house that gave us the inspiration for this build. However, our thinking is that the roots of the turf and moss will grow and intertwine with the wovel hazel hurdles below it and in theory we hope to create a living roof. We are not sure on how well the roof will drain yet, or how long the grass will stay living. I guess time will tell! We then cook up a chilli feast in a cast iron dutch oven over the fire. In Part 4 we hope to build the walls of the shelter and perhaps the beds inside. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe if you enjoyed it. Petromax Cooking Gear (US): //www.petromax.com/ DAD'S CHANNEL TA FISHING: //www.youtube.com/tafishing Watch all VIKING TURF HOUSE Episodes Here: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxC2TSPdh60-zwyMlo-PXVWC Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES): //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg SAXON HOUSE BUILD: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: //taofficial.com TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: //www.taoutdoors.com/shop/ INSTAGRAM: //www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial FACEBOOK: //www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors TWITTER: //twitter.com/OutdoorsTa FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE: Main Camera: //amzn.to/2SG9unv Drone: //amzn.to/2WSQ1za Standard Lens: //amzn.to/2E5LFxs Wide Angle Lens: //amzn.to/2E3U6t0 Zoom Lens: //amzn.to/2tfb4yl 50mm fixed Lens: //amzn.to/2BvUAGN Main Camera Microphone: //amzn.to/2I9tVVQ Secondary Camera Mic: //amzn.to/2WYP3RQ Radio Microphone: //amzn.to/2Ifqaym Camera Light: //amzn.to/2MYA4mn Powerbank: //amzn.to/2WYQVdk Tripod: //amzn.to/2DtumVm GoPro Action Cam: //amzn.to/2UPS9Wx GoPro Chest Mount: //amzn.to/2tfCkwu GoPro Head Mount: //amzn.to/2WWBra3 Camera SD Cards: //amzn.to/2WVWcT5 Editing Laptop: //amzn.to/2BtRK4S BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE: Bushcraft Pants/Trousers: //amzn.to/2SFY8jf 3x3 Metre Tarp: //amzn.to/2IjM4Az Hammock: //amzn.to/2N0Vpvx Hammock underblanket: //amzn.to/2GmeBmT Thermal Camping Air Mattress: //amzn.to/2N0uQXs Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives: //amzn.to/2SLhWle Medium Axe: //amzn.to/2E5NBWK Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe: //amzn.to/2E5FkC1 Small Hatchet: //amzn.to/2I319Gb Affordable Firesteel: //amzn.to/2N1D3L8 Folding Camp Grill: //amzn.to/2BvF6lM Durable GPS Watch: //amzn.to/2N1fQZl #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors
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Building a Viking Turf Roof House: Roof Frame – Bushcraft Project (PART 2)

We continue building the bushcraft viking house. Before we build the turf roof, we needed to build a frame solid enough to be able to take the weight of the turf. For this we used woven hazel sticks or hazel hurdles as they are called. I made a few small log cabin notches on some rafters so that they would sit flush to the ridge pole and support beam. These were then lashed to the timber frame. The hazel hurdles were then put on top and lashed to the frame of the roof. I have one side of the roof going down to the ground, and the other only half way. This is not just for aesthetics, it also allows more room in the shelter for a raised bed or storage area. In the previous episode I cut some logs up with the bushcraft axe and burnt the ends of them to help make them rot-resistant when they are in the ground. At the top of the posts I used a chisel and made some mortise and tenon joints to make the whole structure more secure. The frame still needs some form of purlin support and some wind braces, but the basic frame structure is now complete and ready for the turf roof which we will put on in the next episode! Watch all VIKING TURF HOUSE Episodes Here: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxC2TSPdh60-zwyMlo-PXVWC Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES): //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg SAXON HOUSE BUILD: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt DAD'S CHANNEL TA FISHING: //www.youtube.com/tafishing GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: //taofficial.com TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: //www.taoutdoors.com/shop/ INSTAGRAM: //www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial FACEBOOK: //www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors TWITTER: //twitter.com/OutdoorsTa FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE: Main Camera: //amzn.to/2SG9unv Drone: //amzn.to/2WSQ1za Standard Lens: //amzn.to/2E5LFxs Wide Angle Lens: //amzn.to/2E3U6t0 Zoom Lens: //amzn.to/2tfb4yl 50mm fixed Lens: //amzn.to/2BvUAGN Main Camera Microphone: //amzn.to/2I9tVVQ Secondary Camera Mic: //amzn.to/2WYP3RQ Radio Microphone: //amzn.to/2Ifqaym Camera Light: //amzn.to/2MYA4mn Powerbank: //amzn.to/2WYQVdk Tripod: //amzn.to/2DtumVm GoPro Action Cam: //amzn.to/2UPS9Wx GoPro Chest Mount: //amzn.to/2tfCkwu GoPro Head Mount: //amzn.to/2WWBra3 Camera SD Cards: //amzn.to/2WVWcT5 Editing Laptop: //amzn.to/2BtRK4S BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE: Bushcraft Pants/Trousers: //amzn.to/2SFY8jf 3x3 Metre Tarp: //amzn.to/2IjM4Az Hammock: //amzn.to/2N0Vpvx Hammock underblanket: //amzn.to/2GmeBmT Thermal Camping Air Mattress: //amzn.to/2N0uQXs Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives: //amzn.to/2SLhWle Medium Axe: //amzn.to/2E5NBWK Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe: //amzn.to/2E5FkC1 Small Hatchet: //amzn.to/2I319Gb Affordable Firesteel: //amzn.to/2N1D3L8 Folding Camp Grill: //amzn.to/2BvF6lM Durable GPS Watch: //amzn.to/2N1fQZl #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors
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Building a Turf Roof Viking House with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project (PART 1)

Join me as I build a bushcraft viking house with turf roof. I use basic hand tools and simple building techniques to make a timber frame. This viking house is inspired by the Icelandic vikings. 30% of Iceland was forrested when it was settled. This meant that the vikings had to be resourceful and creative with their building constructions and so they used turf and stones to build the majority of the house. For this build, I am doing it slightly different. As I am in a dense woodland and have plenty of wood supply, I am building the foundations of the house using a basic roundwood timber frame with simple mortise and tenon joints. Traditionally, the vikings of Iceland would have built a foundation of stone and then built turf layers above this. This added great insulation to their houses and protected them from the strong winds and extreme cold. It meant that the house maintained an even temperature all year round. In this video I use basic woodworking techniques and tools to create the timber frame. I make 6 posts from scotts pine (not ideal for timber frame as it is a softwood, but plenty of it around to use). I burn the ends of the posts. By taking the bark off with a drawknife and charring the ends of the poles, it helps make the post more resistant to rot when it is in the ground. I did 6 holes in the ground, right down to the gravel layer. I pack the posts in and then harvest more wood for the support beams. I use a wood mallet, chisel and auger to make mortise holes for the beams to sit on top of the posts. With the basic timber frame now made, I am ready to collect the wood for rafters. In Part 2 I will finish building the rest of the frame. Collecting rafters of different lengths to give the bushcraft shelter a unique look. Be sure to subscribe to keep up to date with the series. Watch All Viking Turf House Episodes here: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxC2TSPdh60-zwyMlo-PXVWC Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES): //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg SAXON HOUSE BUILD: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt DAD'S CHANNEL TA FISHING: //www.youtube.com/tafishing GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: //taofficial.com TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: //www.taoutdoors.com/shop/ INSTAGRAM: //www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial FACEBOOK: //www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors TWITTER: //twitter.com/OutdoorsTa FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE: Main Camera: //amzn.to/2SG9unv Drone: //amzn.to/2WSQ1za Standard Lens: //amzn.to/2E5LFxs Wide Angle Lens: //amzn.to/2E3U6t0 Zoom Lens: //amzn.to/2tfb4yl 50mm fixed Lens: //amzn.to/2BvUAGN Main Camera Microphone: //amzn.to/2I9tVVQ Secondary Camera Mic: //amzn.to/2WYP3RQ Radio Microphone: //amzn.to/2Ifqaym Camera Light: //amzn.to/2MYA4mn Powerbank: //amzn.to/2WYQVdk Tripod: //amzn.to/2DtumVm GoPro Action Cam: //amzn.to/2UPS9Wx GoPro Chest Mount: //amzn.to/2tfCkwu GoPro Head Mount: //amzn.to/2WWBra3 Camera SD Cards: //amzn.to/2WVWcT5 Editing Laptop: //amzn.to/2BtRK4S BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE: Bushcraft Pants/Trousers: //amzn.to/2SFY8jf 3x3 Metre Tarp: //amzn.to/2IjM4Az Hammock: //amzn.to/2N0Vpvx Hammock underblanket: //amzn.to/2GmeBmT Thermal Camping Air Mattress: //amzn.to/2N0uQXs Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives: //amzn.to/2SLhWle Medium Axe: //amzn.to/2E5NBWK Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe: //amzn.to/2E5FkC1 Small Hatchet: //amzn.to/2I319Gb Affordable Firesteel: //amzn.to/2N1D3L8 Folding Camp Grill: //amzn.to/2BvF6lM Durable GPS Watch: //amzn.to/2N1fQZl #bushcraft #vikings #viking #building
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Viking House: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Vikings

We build a bushcraft viking house from the viking age using hand tools only. Inspired by vikings, who were very resourceful and created buildings using the natural materials they scavenged around them. We used simple hand tools such as axe, saw, auger, drawknife, bushcraft knife and other simple tools. To begin with we cut cedar logs from trees that had been felled in the forest. We used an axe and saw to make log cabin notches and built the foundation of the viking house two logs high. We then used the hand auger to build the timber frame. This consisted of 3 large "A" frames. We burnt the ends of the logs in fire to evaporate any moisture and create a rot-proof layer of charred wood which will help to preserve the timber frame foundation when the poles are in the ground. We used a long cedar log as the ridge pole which sits on top of the a frame of the bushcraft shelter. The next stage was building a viking longpit or firepit. This we wanted to make as historically accurate as we could. So we dug a pit about 4 feet long and 2 feet wide. We lined the pit with large stones found in the nearby area. In order to reduce waste of any materials, we used the clay from the pit to secure the stones. We added water to the clay to make it easier to work with and we filled in the gaps between the stones. We then lit a small fire in the pit and let the clay dry out for a few days. At this point we realised we could make our job easier by building a diy saw horse. So we used the drawknife to remove bark from a log (helps to prevent rot). We used the auger to drill four holes for legs and then we made four wood pegs for the top of the saw horse. For the rafters we used more cedar logs and again burnt the ends. It is an ancient japanese technique to preserve wood which is called shou sugi ban. It was then finally time to build the roof of the house. For this, we peeled the bark off the cedar logs. We then put this on the rafters and secured it with some roofing tacks. We had to be fast when doing this, as the cedar bark shrinks and cracks when it dries. We put it on in layers like roof tiles. We built a wood ladder to get up high on the roof and secure the final bark layers. Using an axe and bushcraft, we made some wooden wedges and split a few large cedar logs. We then hewed these logs and built a raised viking bed for the inside of the house. We also made some benches to sit near the fire. At the back of the viking house, we built a folding window and support arm so that we could let light into the house and also improve the airflow. We dug an air vent too, to allow more oxygen to get to the fire. To make the shelter more secure, we built a perimeter wall use cedar posts and hazel saplings (also known as wattle wall). To help further improve the airflow inside the shelter, we cut a hole in the roof and built a ridge cap or ridge vent to act like a chimney and let the smoke out. Overall this viking house took about 10 days to build. It was in winter, so we were restricted by daylight hours. This is not a historically correct viking house. Traditional viking houses were built with large timbers that were hewn from big logs. They had large gable ends almost like log cabins and the roof was made from wood shingles. Often they looked like viking longships or longboats and had many decorative viking features. In a viking longhouse, there would be enough room for many people and animals as well. But this was our take on it. We have done a number of different camping overnight trips in this shelter. We have cooked meat over fire, had great viking feasts and spent many hours keeping warm around the firepit. I hope you enjoyed this vikings inspired bushcraft build. To watch the whole series of individual episodes (where we talk and explain what we are doing) then please follow links below. VIKING HOUSE BUILD (Each Episode): //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg Bushcraft Tools Channel: //www.youtube.com/user/BUSHCRAFTFIRES TA Fishing Channel: //www.youtube.com/user/TAFishing SAXON HOUSE BUILD: //www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: //taofficial.com TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: //www.taoutdoors.com/shop/ INSTAGRAM: //www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial FACEBOOK: //www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors TWITTER: //twitter.com/OutdoorsTa #vikings #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft

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